The wet / dry cycle: when and how to water cannabis

When and how to water Cannabis: the wet / dry cycle

When should you water Cannabis? Is it better to water little and often so that your weed plants never dry out? Actually no. Marijuana thrives when its roots experience a wet / dry cycle. If you are wondering how to water Cannabis, read on ..

There are no set rules as to how much or how often you should water your plants. You have to gauge for yourself the amount and frequency of nutrients and water the plants need at every stage. Cannabis will be able to absorb increasing amounts of feeds depending on the size of the root system and the quantity of light available for photosynthesis. An underdeveloped or damaged root ball will have reduced capacity to uptake any water, and the plant will only demand as much nutrients as the leaves can use for photosynthesis. High temps cause increased demand for water as the leaves transpire to cool down. All this means that we can’t say “give

 ml at day 15”. Because there is no set timetable for watering gardeners need to develop the skill of knowing when their weed plants are thirsty. An under watered plant will droop and it’s leaves hang limp. Unfortunately an overwatered plant looks very much the same. In the first case wilting is the result of the plant losing turgidity, in the second leaves are actually hanging heavy due to excess water weight. Neither scenario is a good one.

Guide to watering cannabis plants

  1. Pot size. Keep your plants in the right size pot in relation to root ball size. This makes it easier to establish a good watering schedule. Roots can only absorb water through direct contact so a young root system in an oversized container results in lots of unused water which quickly stagnates, is low in oxygen and a potential breeding ground for disease. When your plants are growing in the right size pot it’s not only healthier, it enables you to gauge when they have taken up all the available water as the pot becomes noticeably lighter.
  2. Prepare your nutrient and water mix according to the instructions on the feed bottle. Don’t forget to ph this after you have made up the mix.
  3. Thoroughly water the growing medium. Don’t give a little water often, the aim is to thoroughly soak the soil (keep going until water sits at soil level then move on to the next container). The soil will quickly absorb this water into itself as it rehydrated.
  4. Resist the temptation to water again until the soil has become dry. You can check this by gauging the weight of the container and also by inserting your finger into the medium. Waiting until the pot is dry means that when you add water it will pull fresh oxygen with it down to the roots.

Here’s a bit of info about watering and allowing to dry.

Pythium is a fungi that attacks the root systems of plants. It tends to be more of a problem in hydroponic systems and in warm weather. But it also attacks roots in soil that is constantly wet and has low oxygen content. A wet dry cycle works better in a compost situation. A totally dry 6 litre root ball will take to saturation level .75 to 1 litre of water depending on the compost. Now you don’t want this to completely dry out, let it get fairly dry but not enough for the compost to shrink away from the sides of the pot. Then water through from the top slowly. It is best when you are learning to stand your pots in a small pot tray, water until you have a half an inch in the tray, leave them for 15 mins if all the water is drawn in, water again until you have a half an inch again. Give another 15 mins or half an hour, any water left in the tray tip it out the root ball is now saturated. But if it has all been drawn up repeat top watering until you get to the saturated stage.

Tip: Don’t ever leave the plant in the tray with water in for more than an hour or so at the most.

When and how to water Cannabis: the wet / dry cycle

When should you water Cannabis? Is it better to water little and often so that your weed plants never dry out? Actually no. Marijuana thrives when its roots experience a wet / dry cycle. If you are wondering how to water Cannabis, read on ..

There are no set rules as to how much or how often you should water your plants. You have to gauge for yourself the amount and frequency of nutrients and water the plants need at every stage. Cannabis will be able to absorb increasing amounts of feeds depending on the size of the root system and the quantity of light available for photosynthesis. An underdeveloped or damaged root ball will have reduced capacity to uptake any water, and the plant will only demand as much nutrients as the leaves can use for photosynthesis. High temps cause increased demand for water as the leaves transpire to cool down. All this means that we can’t say “give

 ml at day 15”. Because there is no set timetable for watering gardeners need to develop the skill of knowing when their weed plants are thirsty. An under watered plant will droop and it’s leaves hang limp. Unfortunately an overwatered plant looks very much the same. In the first case wilting is the result of the plant losing turgidity, in the second leaves are actually hanging heavy due to excess water weight. Neither scenario is a good one.

Guide to watering cannabis plants

  1. Pot size. Keep your plants in the right size pot in relation to root ball size. This makes it easier to establish a good watering schedule. Roots can only absorb water through direct contact so a young root system in an oversized container results in lots of unused water which quickly stagnates, is low in oxygen and a potential breeding ground for disease. When your plants are growing in the right size pot it’s not only healthier, it enables you to gauge when they have taken up all the available water as the pot becomes noticeably lighter.
  2. Prepare your nutrient and water mix according to the instructions on the feed bottle. Don’t forget to ph this after you have made up the mix.
  3. Thoroughly water the growing medium. Don’t give a little water often, the aim is to thoroughly soak the soil (keep going until water sits at soil level then move on to the next container). The soil will quickly absorb this water into itself as it rehydrated.
  4. Resist the temptation to water again until the soil has become dry. You can check this by gauging the weight of the container and also by inserting your finger into the medium. Waiting until the pot is dry means that when you add water it will pull fresh oxygen with it down to the roots.

Here’s a bit of info about watering and allowing to dry.

Pythium is a fungi that attacks the root systems of plants. It tends to be more of a problem in hydroponic systems and in warm weather. But it also attacks roots in soil that is constantly wet and has low oxygen content. A wet dry cycle works better in a compost situation. A totally dry 6 litre root ball will take to saturation level .75 to 1 litre of water depending on the compost. Now you don’t want this to completely dry out, let it get fairly dry but not enough for the compost to shrink away from the sides of the pot. Then water through from the top slowly. It is best when you are learning to stand your pots in a small pot tray, water until you have a half an inch in the tray, leave them for 15 mins if all the water is drawn in, water again until you have a half an inch again. Give another 15 mins or half an hour, any water left in the tray tip it out the root ball is now saturated. But if it has all been drawn up repeat top watering until you get to the saturated stage.

Tip: Don’t ever leave the plant in the tray with water in for more than an hour or so at the most.

You should not water or feed until you get back to the dry stage again. As the plants draw the water out of the compost, air with oxygen gets drawn into the compost keeping the medium aerobic. When you water through to saturation all the stale gasses get driven out and the cycle starts again.   If growing marijuana in Coco/Perlite, the cycle will be faster than with a soil grow – another advantage to this mix, fresh oxygen in the pots more often.